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Growing older is inevitable? But feeling old isn't? Whether your are concerned with bone or joint health, memory, eyesight or facial lines, Sella Care®'s Healthy Aging products can help keep you looking and feeling great no matter what your age!
$600    
Special Liquid Mineral. There are 90 nutrients essential to human health.

* Non-GMO Project Verified
* GMP Certified
* KOSHER Certified
* GRAS Affirmed
* All Natural
$184    
M3 dietary supplement, full range Amino Acid Chelated Minerals

* The minerals in this highly advanced product which reacted with a whole rice concentrate rather than soy, yeast, or milk proteins that are commonly used to chelated minerals.
* The special rice concentrate used by Sella Care® is seven times higher in amino acid content than ordinary rice and has an amino acid profile preferred by many over soy.
$184    
Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the human body, has several important functions. More than 99% of total body calcium is stored in the bones and teeth where it functions to support their structure. The remaining 1% is found throughout the body in blood, muscle, and the fluid between cells. Calcium is needed for muscle contraction, blood vessel contraction and expansion, the secretion of hormones and enzymes, and sending messages through the nervous system. The physiological functions of calcium are so vital to survival that the body will demineralize bone to maintain normal blood calcium levels when calcium intake is inadequate. Thus, adequate dietary calcium is a critical factor in maintaining a healthy skeleton. A constant level of calcium is maintained in body fluid and tissues so that these vital body processes function efficiently.
$184    
Vitamin C provides antioxidant activity and nutritive support for normal, healthy collagen synthesis, cartilage and bone development, immune function, capillary and blood vessel integrity and nerve impulse transmission.
$184    
The Vitamin E in this product is derived exclusively from 100% natural, unesterfied -alpha-tocopherol, in a base of mixed tocopherols of d-Beta, d-Gamma, d-Delta. The special lecithin used in this product includes phosphatidyl choline, linoleic acid, phosphatidyl inositol, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Lecithin helps to emulsify Vitamin E, making it even more bioavailable. Organic, yeast-free selenium has been combined with Vitamin E to create a unique and powerful antioxidant combination.NATURAL
$600    
Soothing Touch Massage Oils have been designed to meet the professional standard of excellence. In keeping with the principles of Mineral Oil, the ancient healing tradition known as the Science of Life, our Soothing Touch Oils enhance skin contact during body work to help the therapist release tension and unblock vital energies. Formulated for an incredibly smooth glide, Soothing Touch professional massage oils absorb quickly, leaving the skin soft and silky without a greasy residue.

Minerals

For years the supplement market has been dominated by vitamins, but vitamins and amino acids are useless without minerals because all enzyme activities involve minerals. Minerals are needed to maintain the delicate cellular fluid balance, to form bone and blood cells, to provide for electrochemical nerve activity, and to regulate muscle tone and activity (including organ muscles like the heart, stomach, liver, etc.)

Calcium

Most calcium in the body is contained in the bones, but about 1% is used for nerve impulses and muscle contractions (including heart, kidney, and other organs) that sustain life and provide movement. Calcium participates in the protein structuring of RNA and DNA (so it affects the genetic structure and genetic mutations in the body's constant cellular replacement program).

Deficiencies of calcium and magnesium have been linked by researchers to high blood pressure. Calcium also aids in reducing the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, and even in protection against colon cancer.If daily calcium intake is inadequate the body steals bone calcium so that you won't die. In other words, your Blood Serum Calcium and Bone Calcium levels are constantly adjusting to maintain your most vital body functions. A variety of calcium supplements exist, but absorption will vary greatly depending on the type of calcium, added cofactor nutrients that enhance calcium uptake, and individual bioabsorption (mainly adequate digestive acids to dissolve the calcium by the time it reaches the small intestines). Chelated calcium forms like gluconate, citrate, fulvate, and amino acid chelates are metal-free. The citrate malate form is to our knowledge the most bioavailable form of calcium ever researched. The poorest sources of calcium are the carbonate or dolomite type and these types can even contain metallic aluminum or lead.

Chelated Minerals

Chelation is the process by which minerals are tightly bound to amino acid molecules or other organic compounds. This process occurs spontaneously in nature and can also be synthesised.

Due to this binding process, Chelated Minerals are organic and are easily absorbed by the body. Chelated minerals can pass easily through the intestinal wall during digestion and into the blood stream. Minerals, however, that are not attached to an amino acid, may become bound by other substances in the digestive tract e.g. phytic acid from cereal grains. This may inhibit the absorption of these minerals. An example of a naturally occurring chelate is chlorophyll. This is a plant pigment involved with photosynthesis that gives most plants a characteristic green colour. Chlorophyll is a chelate of magnesium. The haemoglobin in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the tissues of the body is a naturally occurring chelate of iron.

Chelated Minerals are manufactured as both dietary supplements and for intravenous injection that is known as chelation therapy. Chelation therapy may be helpful for some patients with heart disease, although there is a lack of well-controlled research studies to substantiate this theory.

In cases of heart or blood vessel disease, plaques build-up on the inside of the arteries and may become hardened with calcium. Chelating agents may be able to bind to and eliminate this calcium. The theory is that by giving chelating agents intravenously, it may be possible to remove calcium from the arteries and possibly dissolve some of the build-up.

Chelating agents were developed earlier in this century as an antidote for mustard gas poisoning during wartime. These minerals have the ability to bind to toxic metals, such as mercury or lead and carry them out of the body. Chelation may also be useful in cases of iron overload. Chelated minerals can bind to and eliminate excess iron from the body.

Body Components and Functions

Bones, teeth, nails, blood, heart, skin, and soft tissue.
? The most important of the 11 nutrients known for bone/tooth formation, blood clotting, heart rhythm,
nerve tranquilization, nerve transmission, muscle growth and contractions.

Minerals

Minerals are elements that originate in the Earth and cannot be made by living organisms. Plants obtain minerals from the soil, and most of the minerals in our diets come directly from plants or indirectly from animal sources. Minerals may also be present in the water we drink, but this varies with geographic locale. Minerals from plant sources may also vary from place to place, because soil mineral content varies geographically

Vitamins

For many years the supplement market has been dominated by vitamins, but vitamins and amino acids are useless without minerals because all enzyme activities involve minerals. Minerals are needed to maintain the delicate cellular fluid balance, to form bone and blood cells, to provide for electrochemical nerve activity, and to regulate muscle tone and activity (including organ muscles like the heart, stomach, liver, etc.) Our bodies need at least 15 minerals to function:
Calcium Phosphorus Magnesium Chromium
Fluoride Iodine Iron Manganese
Selenium Zinc Chloride Potassium
Sodium Molybdenum Copper

Calcium

Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the human body, has several important functions. More than 99% of total body calcium is stored in the bones and teeth where it functions to support their structure. The remaining 1% is found throughout the body in blood, muscle, and the fluid between cells. Calcium is needed for muscle contraction, blood vessel contraction and expansion, the secretion of hormones and enzymes, and sending messages through the nervous system. The physiological functions of calcium are so vital to survival that the body will demineralize bone to maintain normal blood calcium levels when calcium intake is inadequate. Thus, adequate dietary calcium is a critical factor in maintaining a healthy skeleton. A constant level of calcium is maintained in body fluid and tissues so that these vital body processes function efficiently.

Functions
Calcium is a major structural element in bones and teeth. The mineral component of bone consists mainly of hydroxyapatite crystals, which contain large amounts of calcium and phosphate.
-Calcium plays a role in mediating the constriction and relaxation of blood vessels (vasoconstriction and vasodilation), nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and the secretion of hormones like insulin
-Calcium is necessary to stabilize a number of proteins and enzymes, optimizing their activities
-Calcium participates in the protein structuring of RNA and DNA (so it affects the genetic structure and genetic mutations in the body's constant cellular replacement program.)
-Calcium is very helpful for decreasing high blood pressure.
-Calcium also aids in reducing the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, and even in protection against colon cancer
-Calcium plays a role in normal nerve function, and helps blood coagulate when bleeding. Deficiency Symptoms: muscle cramps, heart palpitations , nervousness, backache, bone pain, arm and leg numbness, joint pain, and insomnia. Calcium deficiency affects bone density and increases the risk of osteoporosis. Disease Prevention and Treatment: osteoporosis ,colorectal cancer, kidney stones, lead toxicity, high blood pressure( hypertension), pregnancy-induced hypertension, premenstrual syndrome(PMS), arthritis, finger tremors, insomnia, nervousness, bone pain, overweight, menopause problem, and rheumatism. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA);1300mg ( 9~18 years ), 1000mg (19 ~50 ), 1200mg ( 51 +) Food Sources: Milk and milk products, some dark green leafy vegetables (kale, broccoli, bok choy), fish with edible bones and tofu made with calcium sulfate. Many foods are fortified with calcium, such as some brands of orange juice, bread and soy milk.

Phosphorus

Phosphorus is an essential mineral that is required by every cell in the body for normal function .The majority of the phosphorus in the body is found as phosphate (PO4). Approximately 85% of the body's phosphorus is found in bone and the other 15% is used for many other important processes in the body including the metabolism of red blood cells, and the production of ATP in the energy cycle.

Phosphate is the most abundant intracellular anion and is vital to the formation of bones and teeth, and healthy bones and soft tissues require calcium and phosphorus to grow and develop throughout life Functions - Phosphorus is a major structural component of bone in the form of a calcium phosphate salt called hydroxyapatite and makes up part of DNA and RNA. Phosphorus helps body cells produce energy and acts as a main regulator of energy metabolism in body organs.
A number of enzymes, hormones, and cell-signaling molecules depend on phosphorylation for their activation Phosphorus also helps to maintain normal acid-base balance (pH) by acting as one of the body's most important buffers. Phosphorous plays roles in cell growth and repair and vitamin utilization. Deficiency Symptoms: loss of appetite, fatigue, bone pain, muscle weakness, nervous disorders, irregular breathing, weight loss, and overweight. Disease Prevention and Treatment:constipation, anemia, osteomalacia, rickets, arthritis, kidney stones, Refeeding Syndrome, burns, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperparathyroidism, laxative/bowel preparation for procedures, and total parenteral nutrition. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):1250mg(9~18 years), 700mg(18 + )
Food Sources: Protein-rich foods are the best sources. Legumes and nuts rank next.
Bread and baked goods also contain phosphorus.

Magnesium

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body and is essential to good health. Approximately 50% of total body magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found predominantly inside cells of body tissues and organs. Only 1% of magnesium is found in blood, but the body works very hard to keep blood levels of magnesium constant. Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, supports a healthy immune system, and keeps bones strong. Magnesium also helps regulate blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and is known to be involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis . There is an increased interest in the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Dietary magnesium is absorbed in the small intestines. Magnesium is excreted through the kidneys Functions - Magnesium is involved in more than 300 essential enzymatic metabolic reactions. The metabolism of carbohydrates and fats to produce energy requires numerous magnesium-dependent chemical reactions Magnesium is required for a number of steps during nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) and protein synthesis
Magnesium plays a structural role in bone, cell membranes, and chromosomes
Magnesium is essential for the conversion of vitamin D to its biologically active form that then helps the body absorb and utilize of calcium
Magnesium plays important roles in cell signaling and cell migration
Magnesium can improve energy production within the heart, improve delivery of oxygen to the heart, reduce demand on the heart, inhibit the formation of blood clots, and improve heart rate It also helps maintain nerve and muscle cells and is a component of bones. Deficiency Symptoms: loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions ,irregular heart beat, mental derangement, tremors, easily aroused anger, cramps, seizures, personality changes, abnormal heart rhythms, and coronary spasms. Disease Prevention and Treatment: high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, gastrointestinal disorders, osteoporosis, asthma, chronic fatigue, high cholesterol, alcoholism, kidney stone, prostate troubles, toxemia of pregnancy, and migraine headache. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):240mg(9~13 years), 380mg(14~18), 350mg(19~30), 380mg(31+)
Food sources: Magnesium is found in all foods in varying amounts. Legumes, nuts, whole grains and green vegetables are good sources.

Chromium

Chromium is a mineral that humans require in trace amounts, although its mechanisms of action in the body and the amounts needed for optimal health are not well defined. It is found primarily in two forms: 1) trivalent (chromium 3+), which is biologically active and found in food, and 2) hexavalent (chromium 6+), a toxic form that results from industrial pollution. This fact sheet focuses exclusively on trivalent (3+) chromium. Chromium is known to enhance the action of insulin , a hormone critical to the metabolism and storage of carbohydrate, fat, and protein in the body . In 1957, a compound in brewers' yeast was found to prevent an age-related decline in the ability of rats to maintain normal levels of sugar (glucose) in their blood . Chromium was identified as the active ingredient in this so-called "glucose tolerance factor" in 1959. Functions Chromium works with insulin to help the body use glucose (blood sugar).A biologically active form of chromium participates in glucose metabolism by enhancing the effects of insulin chromium helps raise HDL cholesterol, the "good" kind that escorts bad cholesterol out of your body Many studies have been done on the muscle-enhancing and fat-reducing effects of chromium picolinate. Deficiency Symptoms: diabetic symptoms, including impaired glucose tolerance, arteriosclerosis, and nerve damage. Symptons may resemble diabetes.
Disease Prevention and Treatment: diabetes mellitus, overweight, acne, hypoglycemia, and high blood cholesterol Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):23mcg(9~13 years), 30mcg(14~18), 30mcg(19~50), 25mcg(51+)
Food sources: Good sources include meat, whole grains and nuts.

Copper

Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for humans and animals . It helps build bones and make blood. It is also important in forming elastin and collagen, which are the connective tissues of skin, muscles, heart, blood vessels, and lungs. Copper is involved in the healing process, energy production, hair and skin coloring, and taste sensitivity. It is also needed for healthy nerves and joints. Although Hippocrates is said to have prescribed copper compounds to treat diseases as early as 400 B.C. , scientists are still uncovering new information regarding the functions of copper in the human body. Functions
-Copper is a critical functional component of a number of essential enzymes known as cuproenzymes.
- copper is required for the cross-linking of collagen and elastin, which are essential for the formation of strong and flexible connective tissue.
-Copper is involved with the regulation of gene expression, mitochondrial function/cellular metabolism, antioxidant function as well as the absorption, storage, and metabolism of iron.
- copper helps make hemoglobin, which carries oxygen in the blood.
-The copper-dependent enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase, plays a critical role in cellular energy production.
-A number of reactions essential to normal function of the brain and nervous system are catalyzed by cuproenzymes Deficiency Symptoms:early aging signs, high cholesterol, anemia, gray hair, baldness, artery wall damage, general weakness, low energy, slow healing, joint pain, and brain disturbances. Disease Prevention and Treatment: atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, immune system malfunction, Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anemia, high cholesterol, and skin unelasticity. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):700mcg(9~13years), 890mcg(14~18), 900mcg(19+) Food sources: Organ meats, especially liver; seafood, nuts and seeds. Cooking in copper pots also increases copper content of foods.

Fluoride

Fluoride is considered a trace element because only small amounts are present in the body (about 2.6 grams in adults), and because the daily requirement for maintaining dental health is only a few milligrams a day. Calcium by itself won't build a molecule of bone. To use the calcium, your body has to have adequate supplies of at least 9 other minerals; and flouride is one of those minerals. Functions - calcium and fluoride helps in rebuilding bone loss and prevents new spinal fractures in patients with osteoporosis The predominant mineral elements in bone are crystals of calcium and phosphate, known as hydroxyapatite crystals. Fluoride helps harden tooth enamel, protecting teeth from decay.
Deficiency Symptoms: weak tooth enamel.
Disease Prevention and Treatment: Dental caries (cavities and tooth decay), and osteoporosis.
Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):2mg(9~13 years), 3mg(14~18), 4mg(19+) Food sources: Tea (especially if made with fluoridated water) and fish with edible bones, such as canned salmon. Many communities add fluoride to the water supply, and fluoride supplements may be used with a doctor's supervision. Some types of cooking materials, such as Teflon, can increase the fluoride content of foods.

Iodine

Iodine, a non-metallic trace element, is required by humans for the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Iodine deficiency is an important health problem throughout much of the world. Most of the earth's iodine is found in oceans, and iodine content in the soil varies with region. The older an exposed soil surface, the more likely the iodine has been leached away by erosion. Mountainous regions, such as the Himalayas, the Andes, and the Alps, and flooded river valleys, such as the Ganges, are among the most severely iodine-deficient areas in the world. Functions -Iodine is an essential component of the thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), and is therefore essential for normal thyroid function.
- thyroid hormones regulate a number of physiologic processes, including growth, development, and reproductive function
-Iodine is part of thyroid hormone, which regulates the body's rate of energy use. Deficiency Symptoms: thyroid gland enlargement (goiter), hypothyroidism, intellectual disability, dry hair, irritability, hearing loss, overweight, and growth retardation. Use of iodized salt has virtually eliminated iodine deficiency as a cause of goiter. Disease Prevention and Treatment:goiter, congenital hypothyroidism, arteriosclerosis, growth and developmental abnormality, bacterial conjunctivitis, Graves disease, hearing loss, and Ophthalmia neonatorum prevention. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA);120mcg(9~13years), 150mcg(14~18), 150mcg(18+)
Food sources: Found naturally in saltwater fish and foods grown near coastal areas. Iodine is added to salt.

Iron

- Iron has the longest and best described history among all the micronutrients. It is a key element in the metabolism of almost all living organisms. In humans, , Iron is an essential mineral and an important component of proteins involved in oxygen transport and metabolism. Iron is also an essential cofactor in the synthesis of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. About 15 percent of the body's iron is stored for future needs and mobilized when dietary intake is inadequate. The body usually maintains normal iron status by controlling the amount of iron absorbed from food. Almost two-thirds of iron in the body is found in hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to tissues. Smaller amounts of iron are found in myoglobin, a protein that helps supply oxygen to muscle, and in enzymes that assist biochemical reactions. Iron is also found in proteins that store iron for future needs and that transport iron in blood. Iron stores are regulated by intestinal iron absorption . Functions
-Hemoglobin and myoglobin are iron-containing proteins that are involved in the oxigen transport .
- Cytochromes (iron-containing compounds) are critical to cellular energy production and therefore, life, through their roles in mitochondrial electron transport
iron is essential for the regulation of cell growth and differentiation
iron plays roles in oxygen sensing and DNA synthesis. Deficiency Symptoms: Anemia, fatigue, taste loss, breathing and swallowing difficulty, brittle and spoon-shaped nail, sores at the corners of the mouth, a sore tongue, and infections. Deficiencies are more common among women with regular menstrual periods. Disease Prevention and Treatment: anemia, Impaired intellectual development in children, lead toxicity, impaired immune function, Restless legs syndrome, fatigue, pregnancy complications. Alcoholism, colitis, and menstrual problems. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA): 8mg(9~13 years), 13mg(14~18), 8mg(19~50 male), 18mg(19~50 female), 8mg(51+)
Food sources: Some iron from animal sources is better absorbed than plant sources. Sources include meat, poultry, seafood, legumes, nuts and seeds, breads, cereals and other grain products.

Manganese

Manganese is a mineral element that is nutritionally essential. Many people are deficient in this mineral because as much as 75 percent of all manganese is lost in the refining of wheat to white flour. Functions
-Manganese plays an essential part of proper bone and cartilage formation, it helps build and support strong bones in your body.
-Manganese plays an important role in a number of physiologic processes as a constituent of some enzymes and an activator of other enzymes
- Manganese play important roles in the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, and cholesterol
- Manganese plays a role in wound healing process that requires increased production of collagen. Deficiency Symptoms: impaired growth, transient skin rash, dizziness, hearing loss, and decreased serum cholesterol level. Disease Prevention and Treatment; osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy (seizure disorders), allergy, asthma, and fatigue. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):1.8mg(9~13years), 2.0mg(14~18), 2.1mg(19+)
Food sources: Whole grain products, tea and some fruits and vegetables such as pineapple, kale and strawberries.

Molybdenum

Molybdenum is an essential trace element for virtually all life forms. It functions as a cofactor for a number of enzymes that catalyze important chemical transformations in the global carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles . Thus, molybdenum-dependent enzymes are not only required for human health, but also for the health of our ecosystem. Functions Molybdenum works with riboflavin to incorporate iron into hemoglobin for red blood cells. The biological form of molybdenum, present in almost all molybdenum-containing enzymes (molybdoenzymes) Molybdenum functions as a component in several enzymes that are involved in alcohol detoxification, uric acid formation, and sulfur metabolism Presumably the anticancer effects of molybdenum stem from its role in the detoxification of cancer-causing chemicals Deficiency symptoms: rapid heart and respiratory rates, headache, and night blindness. Disease Prevention and Treatment; gastroesophageal cancer, copper poisoning, Crohn's disease, and improper carbohydrate metabolism. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA): 34mcg(9~13 years), 43mcg(14~18), 45mcg(19+)
Food sources: Milk, legumes, breads and grain products.

Selenium

Selenium is a trace mineral that is essential to good health but required only in small amounts . Selenium is incorporated into proteins to make 25 selenoproteins, which are important antioxidant enzymes. The antioxidant properties of selenoproteins help prevent cellular damage from free radicals. Free radicals are natural by-products of oxygen metabolism that may contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease . Selenium deficiency is commonly seen in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) as their sole source of nutrition. Gastrointestinal disorders may decrease the absorption of selenium resulting in depletion or deficiency. Selenium may be destroyed when foods are refined or processed. Functions - Selenium is incorporated into proteins to make 25 kind of selenoproteins, which are important antioxidant enzymes Selenium works as an powerful antioxidant with vitamin E to protect body cells from damage that may lead to cancer, heart disease and other health problems. selenium help regulate thyroid function and play a role in cell growth and viality. Selenium is thought to play a important role in muscle metabolism Selenium is expressed exclusively in testes and is thought to function in spermatogenesis. Selenium may also be involved in inflammatory and immune responses . Deficiency Symptoms: age spot, heart attack, stroke, heart disease symptoms, muscular dysfunction, immune system disorder, skin disorder, and early aging signs. Disease prevention and Treatment: cardiovascular disease, cardiomyopathy, heart attack, stroke, muscular dystrophy, immune system disorder, Alzheimer disease, cancer, viral infection, type 2 diabetes mellitus, Keshan disease, asthma, burns, cataracts, chemotherapy side effect , cystic fibrosis, skin disorder, and HIV (aids). Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA): 40mcg(9~13years), 55mcg(14~18), 55mcg(19+)
Food sources: Seafood, liver, kidney and other meats. Grain products and seeds also contain selenium, but the amount depends on the type of soil in which they were grown.

Zinc

Zinc is an essential mineral that is found in almost every cell and forms part of over 200 enzymes that have functions ranging from proper action of body hormones to cell growth. Because the body readily uses zinc for many different functions, it constantly needs to be replaced. Sufficient levels of zinc are very important for the body's immunity and strength. The significance of zinc in human nutrition and public health was recognized relatively recently. Clinical zinc deficiency in humans was first described in 1961, when the consumption of diets with low zinc bioavailability due to high phytic acid content (see Food sources) was associated with "adolescent nutritional dwarfism" in the Middle East . Since then, zinc insufficiency has been recognized by a number of experts as an important public health issue, especially in developing countries. Zinc plays a vital role during pregnancy, and because of that, the dosage taken during pregnancy should be increased Functions
-Zinc is necessary for the functioning of over 300 different enzymes and plays a vital role in an enormous number of biological processes
-Zinc is a cofactor for the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) and is in a number of enzymatic reactions involved in carbohydrate and protein metabolism.
-Nearly 100 different enzymes depend on zinc for their ability to catalyze vital chemical reactions.
-Zinc plays an important role in the structure of proteins and cell membranes
-Zinc finger proteins have been found to regulate gene expression by acting as transcription factors
-Zinc plays a role in cell signaling and has been found to influence hormone release and nerve impulse transmission.
-Male hormone metabolism, sperm formation, and sperm motility are all associated with levels of zinc.
-Zinc is essential for growth, cell reproduction, tissue growth, repair and wound healing Deficiency Symptoms; slowing or cessation of growth and development, delayed sexual maturation, characteristic skin rashes, chronic and severe diarrhea, immune system deficiencies, impaired wound healing, poor appetite, night blindness, swelling and clouding of the corneas, fatigue, loss of taste , sterility, behavioral disturbances and reduced resistance to infection are symptoms. Disease prevention and Treatment: Impaired growth and development, Impaired immune system function, diarrhea, alcoholism, alzheimers, arterosclerosis ,gastric ulcer, sickle cell anemia infertility, high cholesterol, osteoporosis, pneumonia, malaria, pregnancy complications, common cold, diabetes mellitus, muscular degeneration, and HIV (AIDS) Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):8mg(9~13years), 10mg(14~18), 10mg(18+)
Food sources; Meat, liver and seafood are the best sources. Whole-grain products, wheat bran, legumes and soybeans are good sources.

Chloride

Salt (sodium chloride) is essential for life. The tight regulation of the body's sodium and chloride concentrations is so important that multiple mechanisms work in concert to control them. Although scientists agree that a minimal amount of salt is required for survival, the health implications of excess salt intake represent an area of considerable controversy among scientists, clinicians, and public health experts. Excess chloride may be linked to high blood pressure in chloride-sensitive people, but more study is needed Functions - Sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) are the principal ions in the fluid outside of cells (extracellular fluid), which includes blood plasma. As such, they play critical roles in a number of life-sustaining processes Sodium and chloride are electrolytes that contribute to the maintenance of concentration and charge differences across cell membranes. Tight control of cell membrane potential is critical for nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and cardiac function Chloride, in the form of hydrochloric acid (HCl), is an important component of gastric juice, which aids the digestion and absorption of many nutrients (2, 5). Deficiency Symptoms: Heavy, persistent sweating, chronic diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, respiratory failure, heat exhaustion, impaired carbohydrate digestion, some forms of kidney disease, headache, muscle cramps, fatigue, disorientation, and fainting Disease Prevention and Treatment:gastric cancer, osteoporosis, kidney stones, heat prostration, sun stroke, muscular weakness and mental apathy. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):3.8g(9~13years), 3.8g(14~18), 3.8g(19~50), 3.3g(50~70), 3.0g(70+)
Food sources: Sea salt, kelp, shellfish. The best source is table salt.

Potassium

Potassium is an essential dietary mineral and electrolyte. The term electrolyte refers to a substance that dissociates into ions (charged particles) in solution, making it capable of conducting electricity. Normal body function depends on tight regulation of potassium concentrations both inside and outside of cells Potassium interacts with sodium to conduct nerve impulses and many other functions in the cells. In the past, high potassium foods used to dominate, but unfortunately through evolution, our food has become saturated with sodium. Functions - Potassium helps regulate fluids and mineral balance in and out of body cells .The concentration differences between potassium and sodium across cell membranes create an electrochemical gradient known as the membrane potential. Tight control of cell membrane potential is critical for nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and heart function . The activation of sodium, potassium-ATPase requires the presence of sodium and potassium. The presence of potassium is also required for the activity of pyruvate kinase, an important enzyme in carbohydrate metabolism (2). The reversal in the potassium/sodium ratio has increased the incidence of high blood pressure; but studies show that increasing dietary potassium intake will lower blood pressure Deficiency Symptoms: muscle weakness and cramps, and intestinal paralysis, bloating, constipation, and abdominal pain, muscular paralysis or abnormal heart rhythms , insomnia, acne, dry skin, thirsty, prolonged vomiting, diarrhea, kidney problems ,weakness, appetite loss, nausea and fatigue. Supplements may be necessary for people taking high blood pressure medication . Disease prevention and Treatment:stroke, hypertention, osteoporosis, kidney stones, angina, diabetes, heart attack, acne, alcoholism, allergy and burn. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):4500mg(9~13years), 4700mg(14~18), 4700mg(18+)
Food sources: Fruits, vegetables, fresh meat, poultry and fish. Particularly good sources include apricots, avocados, bananas, cantaloupe, grapefruit, honeydew, kiwi, oranges, prunes, strawberries, potatoes, tomatoes and dried fruits.

Sodium

Salt (sodium chloride) is essential for life. The tight regulation of the body's sodium and chloride concentrations is so important that multiple mechanisms work in concert to control them. Although scientists agree that a minimal amount of salt is required for survival, the health implications of excess salt intake represent an area of considerable controversy among scientists, clinicians, and public health experts. Sodium is one of the three main electrolytes in the body. Without electrolytes, the body would completely stop working. Healthy people excrete excess sodium, but some kidney diseases interfere with sodium excretion, leading to fluid retention and swelling. Sodium-sensitive people may experience high blood pressure eating a daily diet that contains high levels of sodium. Functions - Sodium helps regulate movement of fluids in and out of body cells Sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) are the principal ions in the fluid outside of cells (extracellular fluid), which includes blood plasma. As such, they play critical roles in a number of life-sustaining processes Sodium and chloride are electrolytes that contribute to the maintenance of concentration and charge differences across cell membranes. Tight control of cell membrane potential is critical for nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and cardiac function Absorption of sodium in the small intestine plays an important role in the absorption of chloride, amino acids, glucose, and water. It is also an important component of gastric juice, which aids the digestion and absorption of many nutrients Sodium is the primary determinant of extracellular fluid volume. Sodium retention results in water retention and sodium loss results in water loss. Deficiency Symptoms: Heavy, persistent sweating, chronic diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, respiratory failure, heat exhaustion, dizziness, impaired carbohydrate digestion, some forms of kidney disease, headache, muscle cramps, fatigue, disorientation, and fainting Disease prevention and Treatment; gastric cancer, osteoporosis, kidney stones, heat prostration, sun stroke, muscular weakness and mental apathy. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):1.5g(9~13years), 1.5g(14~18), 1.5g(19~50), 1.3g(51~70), 1.2g(70+)
Food sources: Processed foods account for about 75 percent of the sodium we eat. Another 25 percent comes from table salt. Only a small amount occurs naturally in food.